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Answer

From: Fred Friedman (FRIEDMAN.FRED@EPAMAIL.EPA.GOV)
Date: Wed Apr 02 1997 - 04:28:00 EST


Date: Wed, 2 Apr 97 09:28 WET
From: FRIEDMAN.FRED@EPAMAIL.EPA.GOV (Fred Friedman)
Subject: Re: Incinerator ash useage (Kristen Riegel)

April 2, 1997

Dear Kristen Riegel:

Talk to the Risk Reduction Engineering Lab or US EPA in Cincinnati, OH, specifically to Carlton Wiles (if he hasn t retired yet) and to people who have worked with him on evaluating Wheelabrator s WES-Phix (lime addition) technology and other techniques for stabilizing/solidifying heavy metals in MSW ash.
The literature is carried throughout the publication SOLID WASTE POWER and SOLID WASTE TECHNOLOGIES from 1991 until 1995.
Also contact the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) which has done much research on utilization of MSW ash.
You must be certain that you aren t talking about coal ash, but rather ash from waste-to-energy plants.

Some of the technologies: pyrolysis, hydrolization, stabilization, chemical treatment, etc. have been developed in Europe and presented at the annual Ash conferences whose proceedings are often available at Technology libraries such as MIT.

Some of the uses MSW ash have already been put towards include:

- road applications
- additive to concrete and asphalt
- pipe bed construction
- cement grouting
- reef building
- ash cinder block construction materials

These latter two uses were piloted by the Environmental Conservation Dept. of the State of NY and the Environment Dept. of the State Univ. of NY at Stony Brook.

There are many, many more sources on this subject which should not be too difficult to find.

Contact Wheelabrator, Inc. of Hampton, NH (Mark Lyons was, I believe, the project lead in 1992) on their stabilization program.

-- Research Library for RCRA



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