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From: Fred Friedman (FRIEDMAN.FRED@EPAMAIL.EPA.GOV)
Date: Wed May 13 1998 - 07:32:00 EDT


Date: Wed, 13 May 98 12:32 WET DST
From: FRIEDMAN.FRED@EPAMAIL.EPA.GOV (Fred Friedman)
Subject: Re: Where is recycling not available in the US?  (Anna Ehrich)

May 13, 1998

Dear Anna Ehrlich,

In Massachusetts, the Municipal Report Card issued by the Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection in 1996 gave the following picture:

The communities which received a D were:

Brockton
Chatham
Gardner
Hanson
Lawrence
Millville
New Braintree
Oxford
Pelham
Plainville
Revere
Richmond
Rochester
Rockland
Salisbury
Warren

The communities on this list that I know have one thing in common: they are poor generally. They are either poor suburban, poor rural or poor urban areas. Each has a well-to-do section of town and is overwhelmingly poor socio-economically.

Now lets test this. What other communities are poor in these demographic ways and what grades did they receive for recycling?:

Abington: C
Amesbury: C
Everett: C
Fall River: F/I (F but incomplete)
Leominster: B
Lowell: C
Lynn: C
New Bedford: C
Palmer: C
Pembroke: B
Tyngsborough: C
Winchendon: C

The thesis seems to hold up: those communities that are poor, lack resources in general, have a generally worse than average recycling record.

I could be completely wrong on a national basis. But I do know that the hypothesis that rural= bad recycling record doesn't hold up.

- Research Library for RCRA



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